• Navigating coronavirus: plant seeds, buy local, reconnect with Nature

The great work now is to carry out the transition from a period of human devastation of the Earth to a period when humans are present to the planet in a mutually beneficial manner”.  – Thomas Berry (1914-2009), Gaia Associate

If you clicked on this page, then we hope you will consider making a donation to the Gaia Foundation – and for that we thank you!

We are a very small team trying to do some very big things. There are two main ways you can help sustain our work:

 

 

One-off donation

Make a one-off donation to support Gaia’s work today – any amount is gratefully received!

 

Donate today

Become a Gaia Ally

Sign up to make a monthly contribution to Gaia and become an ally!

 

Become a Gaia Ally

 

Below, you can find out more about how your donation will support our work to protect and restore our living planet alongside Nature’s best custodians.

Thank you for your support at this critical time.

In gratitude,

The Gaia Team and Global Partners


Small Grants, Big Impact

In 1988, Gaia made its first ‘small grant’ to support the work of legendary Brazilian forest defender Chico Mendes, who played a decisive role in protecting huge swathes of the Amazon rainforest. We realised then that small amounts of money given to the right people at the right time can have a big impact.

Chico Mendes and his wife, Ilsamar. Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Since that time Gaia has used funds raised to support our team and to make many small, flexible grants that enable the communities and partners work with  to respond to challenges or opportunities that arise unexpectedly.

This fund enables us to respond quickly to opportunities or threats, building resilient and healthy communities and ecosystems – to catch the moment as it arises.

With your donation, our Small Grants Fund will support:

  • Grassroots actions by indigenous communities – from Finland to Colombia – to protect, restore and re-wild forest lands and waters, especially when threatened by mining, dams, and other forms of land grabbing.
  • Trainings in eco-cultural mapping with indigenous communities, for knowledge revival and legal recognition of their sacred natural sites and ancestral lands.
  • Strategic information and creative communications to support those who stand firm in protecting their ecosystems and cultures and awaken people to the crises we face.